Michelle Arcila

©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors

Michelle Arcila

Michelle Arcila is a Costa Rican/Colombian photographer based in Brooklyn, NY.  She began working with photography at the age of 14 and received her B.F.A.  in photography from the School of Visual Arts in 2002.  Her work often makes subtle references to her cultural heritage; often using self-portraiture, family, friends as well as nature in her work to help illustrate familiar relationships, memories, and folklore. Michelle has exhibited in Poland, Australia, Belgium, Norway, Paris, Italy and New York. Her work has been published in Vogue Girl Korea, Metro Pop, Les Inrockuptibles, Elle Decor, and the NY Times. Her work also appears in a number of private collections.

A Thousand Ancestors

A Thousand Ancestors is the culmination of a long-standing collaboration between photographer Michelle Arcila and musician/bassist Eivind Opsvik which synthesize the strong influence of visual imagery on music, and vice versa. Hailing from Costa Rica and Norway, two different countries with distinct cultural traditions and folklore, A Thousand Ancestors is an exploration of family history and the continuing influence of ancestral narratives on the present generation.The artists aim to slow time for the observer, and allow him/her to perhaps uncover distant, buried memories of their own during the encounter.

©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors
©Michelle Arcila, from the series, A Thousand Ancestors

Interview with Michelle Arcila

Foto Féminas: How did it come about your project, A Thousand Ancestors

Michelle Arcila: A Thousand Ancestors started in a very organic way. My husband, the musician Eivind Opsvik, and I have always enjoyed collaborating together, it’s how our relationship started, and so when he started to do more solo performances it only seemed natural for us to collaborate together for his live performances with projections.

FF: Why to create a photographic and music collaboration with your husband?
MA: Well I think that in some ways my husband and I are both frustrated filmmakers. So this was our way of tapping into that. We both think in very cinematic ways and I think I have this tendency to treat my photography almost like film stills for a film that has never been made. So it was exciting to be able to add music to the images to help the images move and tell a story. In other words the music takes the place of the missing pieces for this photographic puzzle.
FF: For how long did you work in this project?
MA: I think it took us about 3 years to complete this project. But we had started doing live shows about 7 years ago (Eivind solo on bass and my projections)  I also gave birth to my daughter during the time that we started working on the actual production of the box/record. So becoming parents definitely caused a shift in the project and helped shape it into what it became.
FF: Is it the first time you work in this collaborative style?
MA: Yes. It was the first time I worked in this way with another person but at the same time I think that photography is often a collaborative process especially if you are taking someone’s portrait.
FF: When we met in person in New York, it was interesting to hear how the Latin American culture and your culture heritage from your parents, Costa Rica and Colombia, have influenced your photographic work. Can you talk about how your Latin roots have influenced this project.
MA: The project was heavily influenced by a lot of stories that my maternal grandmother would tell (one of the photos/songs is actually named after her, Zeneida.) as well as a lot of Costa Rican folklore. El Cadejos, for example, is the story of a spirit that often presents itself to travelers in the night in the form of a dog with chains that will either protect or attack you depending on your intentions. Growing up I was told so many stories, that were often presented as true, that had so much to do with the spirit world and shapeshifting. That things were not always as they appear. Which is why so many of the images in A Thousand Ancestors are partly hidden. There was also always a very open conversation in our family about death and it was discussed in both magical and painful ways. In Costa Rica when a family member passes away we hold the vigils in our homes. The body is there for you to contemplate. I remember when my grandfather passed away and looking into the living room from my bedroom and seeing my grandfather’s coffin I didn’t feel scared or confused. It all made sense somehow. I was sad of course but I saw a beauty in it. That experience, at 7 years of age, has probably been the biggest influence on my work.
FF: The topic of family is very visible in all your projects. Can you talk about that.
MA: Well, I grew up with a single mother on Long Island, NY. In a funny way I think that growing up as an only child with a single mother made me a little obsessed with the idea of family. Of course I have a very large family in Costa Rica and a family in Colombia (I didn’t actually meet some of my half-siblings until I was in my twenties and thirties) however, here in NY, we often felt alone. I had to grow up fairly quickly because I basically became my mother’s partner. I had to help her fill out paper work, make phone calls on her behalf, basically offer her a lot of moral support from a young age; not only because of the language barrier but because things were tough and she needed me. My mother definitely makes her way into my work often and that’s because she’s always on my mind.
To learn more about Michelle’s work, visit her website, here.

To learn more about the project, here.


Michelle Arcila

Michelle Arcila es una fotógrafa Costarricense/Colombiana radicada en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Ella empezó a trabajar con fotografía a la edad de 14 años y recibió una licenciatura en fotografía de School of Visual Arts de Nueva York en 2002. Su trabajo normalmente hace referencia a su herencia cultural; usualmente utilizando el auto-retrato, familia, amigos así como también la naturaleza en su trabajo para ilustrar las relaciones familiares, recuerdos y el folklore. Michelle ha exhibido en Polonia, Australia, Bélgica, Francia, Italia y Nueva York. Su trabajo ha sido publicado en Vogue Girl Korea, Metro Pop, Les Inrockuptibles, Elle Decor y NY Times. Su obra también forma parte de colecciones privadas.

A Thousand Ancestors

A Thousand Ancestors es la culminación de un proyecto colaborativo a largo plazo entre la fotógrafa Michelle Arcila y el músico/bajista Eyvind Opsvik, quien sintetiza una gran influencia visual en la música y vice versa. El proyecto cae desde Costa Rica y Noruega, dos países tan diferentes con culturas  y folklore distintivo. A Thousand Ancestors, es una exploración de historias familiares y la continua influencia de las narrativas ancestrales de la generación presente.Los artistas buscan detener el tiempo para el observador, y permitirle la posibilidad de destapar recuerdos distantes o enterrados.

Entrevista con Michelle Arcila

Foto Féminas: ¿Cómo surgió tu proyecto, A Thousand Ancestors?

MA: A Thousand Ancestors empezó de una forma muy orgánica. Mi esposo, el músico Eyvind Opsvi, y yo hemos siempre disfrutado colaborar juntos, de hecho es como nuestra relación empezó, así que cuando él empezó hacer más recitales solo se dió de forma natural para nosotros colaborar juntos para su recitales en vivo con proyecciones.

FF: ¿Por qué crear una colaboración musical y fotográfica entre tu esposo y tú?

MA: Bueno, de alguno u otra forma encuentro que mi esposo y yo somos unos cineastas frustrados. Así que esta fue nuestra forma de abordarlo. Los dos pensamos en formas muy cinematecas, y encuentro que tenemos esta tendencia de tratar mi fotografía como escenas de películas para una película que nunca ha sido realizada. Es por ello que fue emocionante agregar música a las imágenes para ayudar a las imágenes a que se movieran y contaran una historia. En otras palabras, la música toma el lugar de las piezas que faltan en este rompe cabeza fotográfico.
FF: ¿por cuánto tiempo trabajaron en este proyecto?

MA: Nos tomo unos 3 años para completar el proyecto, pero empezamos a realizar recitales en vivo hace unos 7 años (Eivind solo en el bajo y yo con mis proyecciones) Yo también dí a luz a mi hija durante este tiempo que empezamos a trabajar en la producción del disco y caja. Así que convirtiéndonos en padres definitivamente causó un efecto en el proyecto y lo ayudó a dar forma en lo que se convirtió.

FF: ¿es la primera vez que trabajas en este modo colaborativo?

MA: Si, fue la primera vez que trabajo con una persona de este modo, pero a su misma vez  pienso que fotografía es usualmente un proceso colaborativo, especialmente si estás tomando el retrato de alguien.

FF: Cuando nos conocimos personalmente en Nueva York, fue interesante escuchar como la cultura latinoamericana y tu herencia cultural de tus padres, siendo de Costa Rica y Colombia, han influenciado tu obra fotográfica. Nos podrías hablar de cómo tus raíces latinas han influenciado este proyecto.

MA: El proyecto fue muy influenciado por muchas historias que mi abuela materna me contaba (una de las fotos/canciones fue nombrada como ella, Zeneida) así como también por el folklore Costarricense. El Cadejos, por ejemplo, es la historia de un espíritu que se presenta usualmente por sí mismo a los viajeros en la noche en la forma de perro con cadenas que te protegerá o atacará dependiendo de tus intenciones. Cuando estaba creciendo me contaban muchas historias, que muchas veces se me eran presentadas como verdaderas, que tenían mucho que ver con el mundo espiritual. Las cosas no son siempre como parecen ser, es por ello que muchas de las imágenes  que aparecen en A Thousand Ancestors, están de alguna forma escondidas. También siempre hubo mucha conversación en nuestra familia sobre la muerte, y esto se habló de ambas formas, mágico y doloroso. En Costa Rica, cuando un familiar fallece guardamos las vigilias en la casa. El cuerpo está ahí para que tú lo contemples. Yo recuerdo cuando mi abuelo falleció y yo veía hacia la sala desde mi cuarto la urna con él, yo no sentía miedo, ni me sentía confundida, de alguno u otra forma todo tenía sentido. Estaba triste claro, pero encontré su belleza también. Esa experiencia, a los 7 años, ha sido probablemente la mayor influencia en mi trabajo.

FF: El enlace familiar se ve marcado en todos tus proyectos. Hablanos un poco sobre esto.

MA: Bueno, crecí con una madre soltera en Long Island, NY. De alguna forma graciosa, creciendo siendo única hija me hizo obsesionarme un poco con la idea de familia. Claro, tengo una familia muy larga en CostaRica y en Colombia (no conocí algunos de mis medio-hermanos hasta que estaba en mis 20s y 30s) Sin embargo, aquí en NY, nos sentíamos solas. Tuvo que crecer rápido, ya que básicamente me convertí en la pareja de mi madre. La tenía que ayudar a rellenar planillas, realizar llamadas por ella, básicamente brindarle mucho apoyo moral desde una temprana edad; no solo por la barrera del idioma, pero porque las cosas eran difíciles y ella me necesitaba. Mi madre sin duda alguna logra acceder a mis proyectos porque siempre está en mi mente.

Para saber más sobre el trabajo de Michelle, aquí.
Para saber más sobre el proyecto, aquí.

Advertisements